Portal 2 Released! #portal2

20 04 2011

Oh cool. They’ve given me Portal 2. I’m finalising my Steam install as I type this. VALVe seem to taken on-board my major criticism and updated the game to include hats from Team Fortress 2. I suspect they were kidding when they first said “No hats”. Then again, I thought the cross-platform gaming part was a joke. However it is true PC gamers can play Portal 2 with their PS3 and Xbox 360 owning buddies. Is that a gaming first? I think so…

Anyway, Portal 2 is a Thinking-Person’s-First-Person-Shooter. I should be getting a trademark on that new genre, but no. Instead I’m going to persuade you that Portal 2 is worth a look. For the visually stimulated ones present, here’s a convincing video.

Why don’t you download the game and we’ll race to see who is playing first!

Please visit the Portal 2 official website for more information.

Hmm how is that download getting on? Oh Portal 2 – 100% complete.

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End of newsflash.





Simple Fix For Dead Microsoft Wireless Receiver for Windows Fault

16 06 2010

Ok, over a year ago we purchased a Microsoft Wireless Receiver for Windows. This device allows you to use Xbox 360 wireless controllers on Windows PC. It’s a fantastic piece of kit, and has seen action on many Games For Windows titles.

It’s a great way to play games. Games For Windows titles contain preset gamepad profiles. The game will be configured as the developers intended. That makes things really simple compared to other HID, which usually require manual configuration to achieve the optimum ease of use.

Another bonus are the Microsoft button icons. Take Kung-Fu Panda for example; there’s several parts of the game that require you to press an ordered sequence of buttons at the correct moment. With a standard controller, it would just say “Button 9” or something. With a Xbox 360 controller, it would draw a simple button icon to indicate exactly where the button is. It’s far less complicated for small children – and much more console-like.

Anyway… ours died. The light no longer lit up, and Windows Device manager couldn’t find it in any USB socket. I was about to throw it away, when I thought I’d google the fault. I’m sure glad I did. A new one would have been expensive, and would have the same issue eventually.

It seems we’re not the first people to have this problem. It almost seems like it’s an intentional fault. A tiny under-rated fuse seems to blow when exposed to heat. If you leave it anywhere slightly warm – there’s a good chance the feeble fuse will break. I guess it wasn’t a good idea leaving it on the amplifier.

I found this post, which contained several quality photos and instructions on how to fix. Sure enough Grandpa-Goat put a blob of solder on “Fuse F1” and it fixed it totally.

For your pleasure, here are some photos and a video. Enjoy!